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How to Overclock CPU

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Overclocking anything can be terrifying because you don’t want to mess with your expensive components can sometimes be scary for someone who doesn’t know how to do it. But know it’s relatively easy to follow the steps, which the manufacturers have made it more accessible over the years.

CPU overclocking is the process of expanding the clock speed at which the CPU runs. Overclocking your CPU can improve your computer’s performance, but it does carry some risks, so in this article, we’ll see if it’s worth it, especially how to achieve it.

Danger

Overclocking a component comes with risks, and overclocking a CPU is no different. Increasing the CPU’s clock speed and voltage can increase the component’s heat output. Computer processing units can handle pretty high temperatures before they get into trouble, so you’ll know for sure if performance goes down.

Heat is a significant threat to the CPU if it keeps spinning above 85 degrees, but you can avoid it by using a decent fan or cooler pad. Make sure you are not using the standard cooler that comes with the chip. Don’t be worried if your CPU bang high warmth as the CPU can handle a bit of heat, but investing in CPU cooling fans is a good choice.

It runs faster than intended, which shortens product life, but some chips are plan with overclocking in mind. These CPUs with overclocking also have limitations, so trial and error can cause the chips to bake, so it’s best to check the maximum voltage you can reach before you start.

As long as you know the CPU’s limitations and have adequate cooling, you can go ahead!

Benefits of Overclocking CPU

Overclocking the CPU gives you some extra energy to support the performance of gaming, media editing, and general tasks at no additional cost. Overclocking can be a good option for anyone looking for an upgrade or waiting for a new generation of CPUs.

Things To Examine

  • As referred above, overclocking can ruin the CPU and should only be considered if you agree with the possibility of damage to the component. Wise use of overclocking won’t hurt it, but it’s the most considerable risk you’re willing to take.
  • If you want to expand the frame rate in the game, I recommend overclocking the graphics cards.
  • Overclocking the CPU on a PC computer isn’t a big deal, thanks to airflow and cooling pad. Still, it’s usually overheating, so don’t do that on a laptop under 500 unless you explicitly state that you can handle it.
  • Most motherboards are designed for overclocking and can be done quickly in the BIOS. Please refer to the user manual to check.
  • Specific CPUs are designed for overclocking, so keep your eye on them and double-check if your CPU is one of them. For example, the i7 8700 can also be used for overclocking, but it is called i7 8700k.

Required tools

To benchmark overclocking or run the proper stress test, you may need to download a few tools before starting. These tools can test your CPU performance and track these results over time.

  • CPU-Z By downloading this tool, you can check the clock speed and voltage of your CPU. Primarily you can use this to track how your CPU works and whether changes are being applied.
  • Prime95-If you want to do stress testing, you can use Prime95 to run long-term tests and benchmark performance.
  • HWiNFO-This tool is handy and can help you checked your components, but more importantly, it can monitor critical temperatures in overclocking.

If you want to monitor performance or benchmark a new overclocked system, you must first compare the results using the default benchmarks.

Increase the default clock

  • Most of the changes are made in the BIOS, so you will have to restart your computer. After the computer restarts, you can access the BIOS by pressing the “Delete” key. Each BIOS is specific to the motherboard manufacturer, so look for the label while browsing.
  • Opens the Frequency Settings page, also known as “Frequency Control”, “Voltage Control”, or “Overclocking”. Here you can adjust the CPU’s clock speed and voltage.
  • It is essential to reduce the memory bus speed in the setup as memory can cause errors during overclocking. I’m trying to set this setting to the lowest.
  • Speed up the base clock (front bus) by 10%. Most processors can handle these small changes hassle-free, improving them by 10% and seeing how they perform in your stress testing application.
  • Expand the base clock until the system becomes unstable. Increase the number in 5-10 MHz increments until you find the best clock rate for your system. To stay safe, benchmark all adjustments until things become unstable.

Multiplier increase

  • First, lower the base clock a bit. It would help if you did this before increasing the multiplier as it can produce more stable results in the long run and make it more accurate. The higher the multiple, the lower the base clock, the more stable the system, but the higher the base clock and the lower the numerous, the better performance, so find a balance.
  • Now the base clock has been reduced, and the time to increase the multiplier by 0.5 has been reduced. The multiplier is also known as the CPU clock rate depending on the motherboard and is usually set automatically. you run the benchmark program, check how the system works, assume everything is fine, and repeat this process. Keep monitoring the temperature after the change at this stage.

Increase voltage

  • Increase the CPU voltage, but only increase it in 0.025 steps. If you expand the voltage overboard, you risk damaging the CPU. Run a stress trial and confirm that the voltage rise has stabilized the system in the earlier step. If it’s stable, make sure that the temperature are also at the right level. If the system carry on to be unstable, try lowering the base clock or multiplier.
  • Repeat the above steps until the maximum voltage and temperature are reached, then the limit of the component is reached.
  • Now you can return your memory speed to its previous level, but to be safe, do it slowly, step by step, while doing the stress test. It may not completely go back to its previous state.
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